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  1. #101


    Yes | No
    Fuck.

    Wasn't he just in KC?

  2. #102
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    From Wikipedia:


    Chris Cornell (born Christopher John Boyle; July 20, 1964 – May 17, 2017) was an American musician, singer and songwriter, best known as the lead vocalist, primary songwriter and rhythm guitarist for Seattle rock band Soundgarden and as lead vocalist and songwriter for the group Audioslave. He was also known for his numerous solo works and soundtrack contributions since 1991, and as founder and frontman for Temple of the Dog, the one-off tribute band dedicated to his late friend Andrew Wood.

    Cornell was known for his role as one of the architects of the 1990s grunge movement, for his extensive catalog as a songwriter and for his near four octave vocal range, as well as his powerful vocal belting technique. He released four solo studio albums, Euphoria Morning (1999), Carry On (2007), Scream (2009), Higher Truth (2015) and the live album Songbook (2011). Cornell received a Golden Globe Award nomination for his song "The Keeper" which appeared in the film Machine Gun Preacher and co-wrote and performed the theme song to the James Bond film Casino Royale (2006), "You Know My Name". He was voted "Rock's Greatest Singer" by readers of Guitar World, ranked 4th in the list of "Heavy Metal's All-Time Top 100 Vocalists" by Hit Parader, 9th in the list of "Best Lead Singers of All Time" by Rolling Stone, and 12th in MTV's "22 Greatest Voices in Music".



    Grammar Police: To Correct and Serve -- Every time you misspell a word, the errorists win.

  3. #103


    Yes | No
    Also, Roger Ailes.

  4. #104
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    Go ahead and add Bond (one of em) to the list:



    (21:01:09) ICThawk: z5 sweats swag and cums value

  5. #105
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    Seems like Moore famous people are dying these days.....
    Grammar Police: To Correct and Serve -- Every time you misspell a word, the errorists win.

  6. #106


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    Quote Originally Posted by MissTCShore View Post
    Seems like Moore famous people are dying these days.....
    Red Thumb

  7. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by MissTCShore View Post
    Seems like Moore famous people are dying these days.....

    Roger that, MissT


    (21:01:09) ICThawk: z5 sweats swag and cums value

  8. #108
    Magic Grue Trainer/Author
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    Gregg-Allman-bw-billboard-1548.jpg

    Gregg Allman dead at 69.

  9. #109


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    Booooooo. RIP Adam West

    batman.jpg

  10. #110

  11. #111
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    Grammar Police: To Correct and Serve -- Every time you misspell a word, the errorists win.

  12. #112
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    Grammar Police: To Correct and Serve -- Every time you misspell a word, the errorists win.

  13. #113


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    Your Delta Tau Chi name is Corpse.

    AnimalHouse_043Pyxurz.jpg

  14. #114
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    Quote Originally Posted by GardArmighty View Post
    Your Delta Tau Chi name is Corpse.

    AnimalHouse_043Pyxurz.jpg
    I can't stop laughing. I'm going to hell.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapadatass
    It's pitch black. You are likely to be eaten by a grue.

  15. #115


    Yes | No
    This probably belongs on the football board, but KU great Keith Loneker Sr. passed away after a battle with cancer

    http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2017/ju...er-ex-/?sports

    The dude was a badass football player and from the sound of things a hell of a guy. His son is a current member of the Jayhawks football team.

  16. #116
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    Glen Travis Campbell (April 22, 1936 – August 8, 2017) was an American singer, songwriter, musician, television host, and actor. He is best known for a series of hits in the 1960s and 1970s, and for hosting a music and comedy variety show called The Glen Campbell Goodtime Hour on CBS television, from January 1969 through June 1972.[2]


    During his 50 years in show business, Campbell released more than 70 albums. He sold 45 million records and accumulated 12 RIAA gold albums, four platinum albums, and one double-platinum album. He placed a total of 80 different songs on either the Billboard Country Chart, Billboard Hot 100, or Adult Contemporary Chart, of which 29 made the top 10 and of which nine reached number one on at least one of those charts. Campbell's hits include his recordings of John Hartford's "Gentle on My Mind"; Jimmy Webb's "By the Time I Get to Phoenix", "Wichita Lineman", and "Galveston"; Larry Weiss's "Rhinestone Cowboy"; and Allen Toussaint's "Southern Nights".


    Campbell made history in 1967 by winning four Grammys in the country and pop categories. For "Gentle on My Mind", he received two awards in country and western, "By the Time I Get to Phoenix" did the same in pop. Three of his early hits later won Grammy Hall of Fame Awards (2000, 2004, 2008), while Campbell himself won the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2012. He owns trophies for Male Vocalist of the Year from both the Country Music Association (CMA) and the Academy of Country Music (ACM), and took the CMA's top award as 1968 Entertainer of the Year. Campbell appeared as a supporting role in the film True Grit (1969), which earned him a Golden Globe nomination for Most Promising Newcomer. Campbell also sang the title song, which was nominated for an Academy Award.


    Grammar Police: To Correct and Serve -- Every time you misspell a word, the errorists win.

  17. #117
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    When I was a wee lad, I would dress up like a cowboy and play "Rhinestone Cowboy" over and over and over and over again.

  18. #118
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    Quote Originally Posted by Protist View Post
    When I was a wee lad, I would dress up like a cowboy and play "Rhinestone Cowboy" over and over and over and over again.
    Pretty sure that's a sign of gender dysphoria.

  19. #119


    Yes | No
    Before his singing career, Campbell also played on many important records, such as "Pet Sounds," as part of the Wrecking Crew. A true giant.

  20. #120
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    January 2017 Notable Deaths

    Been looking back at 2017 so far, and here are some more folks, here are some just from January.


    Clare Hollingworth, OBE (10 October 1911 – 10 January 2017) was an English journalist and author. She was the first war correspondent to report the outbreak of World War II, described as "the scoop of the century".[1] As a reporter for The Daily Telegraph in 1939, while travelling from Poland to Germany she spotted and reported German forces massed on the Polish border; three days later she was the first to report the German invasion of Poland.[2]


    James Reiher Snuka[a] (born James Wiley Smith; May 18, 1943 – January 15, 2017), better known by the ring name Jimmy "Superfly" Snuka, was a Fijian professional wrestler and actor.

    Snuka wrestled for several promotions from the 1970s to 2010s. He was best known for his time in the World Wrestling Federation (WWF, now WWE) in the early to mid-1980s and was credited with introducing the high-flying style of wrestling to the WWF.[2] He was inducted into the WWF Hall of Fame in 1996. Snuka was the inaugural ECW Heavyweight Champion (a title he held twice) in Eastern Championship Wrestling (later Extreme Championship Wrestling). His children, Jimmy Reiher, Jr. and Tamina Snuka, are also wrestlers.

    Snuka was indicted and arrested in September 2015 on third-degree murder and involuntary manslaughter charges, in relation to the May 1983 death of his girlfriend, Nancy Argentino. Snuka pleaded not guilty,[9][10] but was ultimately found unfit to stand trial in June 2016 due to being diagnosed with dementia.[11] As his health declined,[12] the charges were dismissed on January 3, 2017.[13] He died twelve days later.


    Miguel Josι Ferrer (February 7, 1955 – January 19, 2017) was an American actor. His breakthrough role was the OCP Vice-president Bob Morton in the 1987 film RoboCop. Other film roles include Commander Harbinger in Hot Shots! Part Deux (1993), Shan Yu in Mulan (1998), Eduardo Ruiz in Traffic (2000) and Vice President Rodriguez in Iron Man 3 (2013).

    Ferrer's notable television roles include FBI Agent Albert Rosenfield on Twin Peaks (1990–1991, 2017), Dr. Garret Macy on Crossing Jordan (2001–2007) and NCIS Assistant Director Owen Granger on NCIS: Los Angeles (2012–2017).

    He was the son of actor Josι Ferrer and singer Rosemary Clooney.


    Sir John Vincent Hurt, CBE (22 January 1940 – 25 January 2017) was an English actor whose screen and stage career spanned more than 50 years. Hurt was regarded as one of Britain's finest actors; director David Lynch described him as "simply the greatest actor in the world".[1][2]

    Hurt came to prominence for his role as Richard Rich in the film A Man for All Seasons (1966) and gained BAFTA Award nominations for his portrayals of Timothy Evans in 10 Rillington Place (1971) and Quentin Crisp in television film The Naked Civil Servant (1975) – winning his first BAFTA for the latter. He played Caligula in the BBC TV series I, Claudius (1976). Hurt's performance in the prison drama Midnight Express (1978) brought him international renown and earned Golden Globe and BAFTA Awards, along with an Academy Award nomination. His BAFTA-nominated portrayal of astronaut Kane, in science-fiction horror Alien (1979), yielded a scene which has been named by a number of publications as one of the most memorable in cinematic history; Hurt re-enacted the scene as a cameo appearance in science fiction parody Spaceballs (1987).[3]

    Hurt earned his third competitive BAFTA, along with his second Oscar and Golden Globe nominations, as Joseph Merrick in David Lynch's biopic The Elephant Man (1980). Other significant roles during the 1980s included Bob Champion in biopic Champions (1984), Mr. Braddock in the Stephen Frears drama The Hit (1984), Winston Smith in Nineteen Eighty-Four (1984) and Stephen Ward in the drama depicting the Profumo affair, Scandal (1989). Hurt was again BAFTA-nominated for his work in Irish drama The Field (1990) and played the primary villain, James Graham, in the epic adventure Rob Roy (1995). His later films include the Harry Potter film series (2001–11), the Hellboy films (2004 and 2008), supernatural thriller The Skeleton Key (2005), western The Proposition (2005), political thriller V for Vendetta (2006), sci-fi adventure Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull (2008) and the Cold War espionage film Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011). Hurt reprised his role as Quentin Crisp in An Englishman in New York (2009), which brought his seventh BAFTA nomination and he portrayed the War Doctor in BBC TV series Doctor Who in 2013.[4][5]

    With a distinctive rich voice, Hurt enjoyed a successful voice acting career in films such as Watership Down (1978), the animated The Lord of the Rings (1978), The Plague Dogs (1982), The Black Cauldron (1985) and Dogville (2003), as well as the BBC TV series Merlin (2008–2012).[6] In 2012, he was honoured with the Lifetime Achievement BAFTA Award, in recognition of his "outstanding contribution to cinema".[7] He was knighted in 2015 for his services to drama.


    Mary Tyler Moore (December 29, 1936 – January 25, 2017) was an American actress, known for her roles in the television sitcoms The Mary Tyler Moore Show (1970–1977), in which she starred as Mary Richards, a single woman working as a local news producer in Minneapolis, and The Dick Van Dyke Show (1961–1966), in which she played Laura Petrie, a former dancer turned Westchester homemaker, wife and mother.[1][2][3][4] Her film work includes 1967's Thoroughly Modern Millie and 1980's Ordinary People, in which she played a role that was very different from the television characters she had portrayed, and for which she was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress.[5][6][7]

    Due to her roles on both The Mary Tyler Moore Show and The Dick Van Dyke Show, in which her characters often broke from stereotypical images of women and pushed gender norms, Moore became a cultural icon and served as an inspiration for many younger actresses, professional women, and feminists.[8][9][10] She was later active in charity work and various political causes, particularly the issues of animal rights, vegetarianism[11] and diabetes. She was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes early in the run of The Mary Tyler Moore Show.[12] She also suffered from alcoholism, which she wrote about in her first of two memoirs. In May 2011, Moore underwent elective brain surgery to remove a benign meningioma.[13] She died from cardiopulmonary arrest due to pneumonia at the age of 80 on January 25, 2017.[14]


    Mike Connors (born Krekor Ohanian; August 15, 1925 – January 26, 2017) was an Armenian-American actor best known for playing private detective Joe Mannix in the CBS television series Mannix from 1967 to 1975, a role which earned him a Golden Globe Award in 1970, the first of six straight nominations, as well as four consecutive Emmy nominations from 1970 through 1973. He also starred in the short-lived series Tightrope! (1959-1960) and Today's FBI (1981-1982). Connors' acting career spanned six decades; in addition to his work on television, he appeared in numerous films, most notably the 1965 World War II black comedy Situation Hopeless... But Not Serious, in which he and Robert Redford played American soldiers taken prisoner by a German villager played by Alec Guinness.


    Barbara Hale (April 18, 1922 – January 26, 2017) was an American actress best known for her role as legal secretary Della Street on more than 270 episodes of the long-running Perry Mason television series from 1957 to 1966, earning her a 1959 Emmy Award as Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series. She reprised the role in 30 Perry Mason movies for television. Her many film roles included The Window (1949), in which she starred as the mother of a boy who witnesses a murder.

  21. #121
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    January 2017 - Part 2


    Geoffrey James "Geoff" Nicholls (28 February 1948 – 28 January 2017) was a British musician and keyboardist, and longtime member of the heavy metal band Black Sabbath, until 2004. Nicholls also played in the NWOBHM band Quartz, before joining Black Sabbath. In the 1960s/early 1970s, Geoff played lead guitar for the Birmingham bands The Boll Weevils, The Seed, Johnny Neal and the Starliners and keyboards for World Of Oz.

    Nicholls was originally brought in as a second guitarist when Black Sabbath doubted whether they would even continue under that name. Nicholls then switched to bass when Geezer Butler left briefly, and then became the band's keyboardist upon Butler's return and the decision to keep the Sabbath name. Nicholls' first appearance on a Black Sabbath album was on Heaven and Hell (1980), and he was credited as keyboardist on every Sabbath release from that time until 13 (2013), although he was not an official member until 1986. He remained an official member until 1991, then regained member status from 1993 to 1996. He was an unofficial member once again since the reunion with Ozzy Osbourne in 1997. Although his main role with Sabbath was on the keyboard, Nicholls also played some rhythm guitar on the reunion tours, e.g., during Iommi's solo in "Snowblind" and a few tracks during the Headless Cross (1989) and Forbidden (1995) tours.[1]

    Nicholls' involvement with the band ended when Adam Wakeman (a member of Ozzy Osbourne's solo band) was chosen to play keyboards during Sabbath's 2004 and 2005 tours as part of Ozzfest, and Scott Warren (Dio) handled keyboard duties on the 2007 Heaven & Hell tour.

    Until his death, Nicholls played keyboards with former Black Sabbath singer Tony Martin, in his band Tony Martin's Headless Cross.[2] Nicholls had previously performed on both of Martin's solo albums and their support tours.



    SAN DIEGO — Ken Hartle, who as a Navy diver during World War II had the grim task of retrieving bodies from ships sunk by the Japanese at Pearl Harbor, has died. He was 103.

    Hartle died Tuesday afternoon at an Escondido, California, center for people with Alzheimer's disease or dementia, the San Diego Union-Tribune reported Friday. A reporter was at his bedside with Hartle's son and daughter three hours before his death.


    Frank Joseph Pellegrino (May 19, 1944 – January 31, 2017) was an American actor and restaurateur.[1]

    Born in East Harlem, Pellegrino has often acted in law and gangster-themed film and television productions. He was a member of an early 1960s singing group called the Holidaes. Notable acting roles include Johnny Dio in Goodfellas, assorted appearances on Dick Wolf's Law & Order, and FBI Chief Frank Cubitoso on HBO's The Sopranos.

    Pellegrino was a co-owner of the restaurant Rao's in New York City. Books written by Pellegrino include Rao's Cookbook, Rao's Recipes from the Neighborhood and Rao's on the Grill. He also produced the CD An Evening at Rao's, featuring music from Rao's jukebox.

    Pellegrino died from lung cancer on January 31, 2017 in Manhattan. He was 72.[2][3]

  22. #122
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    February 2017 Notable Deaths


    Alexander Duncan McCowen CBE (26 May 1925[1] – 6 February 2017) was an English actor. He was known for his work in numerous film and stage productions. He played 'Q' in the James Bond Movie, "Never Say Never Again".


    "Professor" Irwin Corey (July 29, 1914 – February 6, 2017) was an American stand-up comic, film actor and activist, often billed as The World's Foremost Authority. He introduced his unscripted, improvisational style of stand-up comedy at the San Francisco club, the hungry i. Lenny Bruce described Corey as "one of the most brilliant comedians of all time".[2]


    Richard Lawrence Hatch (May 21, 1945 – February 7, 2017) was an American actor, writer and producer. Hatch began his career as a stage actor, before moving on to television work in the 1970s. Hatch is best known for his role as Captain Apollo in the original Battlestar Galactica television series.


    Harold Gregory "Hal" Moore, Jr. (February 13, 1922 – February 10, 2017) was a United States Army lieutenant general and author. He was a recipient of the Distinguished Service Cross, which is the U.S. military's second highest decoration for valor, and was the first of his West Point class (1945) to be promoted to brigadier general, major general, and lieutenant general.

    Moore is best remembered as the lieutenant colonel in command of the 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment, at the Battle of Ia Drang in 1965, during the Vietnam War. The battle was made into the movie We Were Soldiers in 2002, which starred actor Mel Gibson as Moore; Moore was the "honorary colonel" of the regiment.

    In 2007, Moore's volunteer driver wrote a book on Moore's personal religious journey titled A General's Spiritual Journey. In 2013, author Mike Guardia published the first full-length biography of Moore's life and career titled Hal Moore: A Soldier Once...and Always.

    Moore was awarded the Order of Saint Maurice by the National Infantry Association[3] as well as the Distinguished Graduate Award by the West Point Association of Graduates.[4]


    Alwin Lopez "Al" Jarreau (March 12, 1940 – February 12, 2017) was an American singer and musician. He received a total of seven Grammy Awards and was nominated for over a dozen more. Jarreau is perhaps best known for his 1981 album Breakin' Away. He also sang the theme song of the late-1980s television series Moonlighting, and was among the performers on the 1985 charity song "We Are the World".


    William James Myers (April 16, 1937 – February 16, 2017), better known by his ring name George "The Animal" Steele, was an American professional wrestler, school teacher, author, and actor. His career lasted from 1967 until 1988, though he made occasional wrestling appearances into the 1990s and 2000s.

    Steele portrayed Swedish wrestler and actor Tor Johnson in Tim Burton's film Ed Wood.[4]



    Neil Fingleton (18 December 1980 – 25 February 2017) was an English actor and basketball player. He was the tallest British-born man and the tallest man in the European Union at 7 ft 7.56 in (232.6 cm) in height and among the 25 tallest men in the world.[1][2] He portrayed "Giant Mag the Mighty" in Game of Thrones.

    This title has been confirmed by the Guinness Book of Records in the summer of 2007; Fingleton took over from Christopher Greener who stood at 7 ft 6 Ό in (229.2 cm) in height.


    William "Bill" Paxton (May 17, 1955 – February 25, 2017) was an American actor and film director.

    The films in which he appeared include The Terminator (1984), Weird Science (1985), Aliens (1986), Predator 2 (1990), Tombstone (1993), True Lies (1994), Apollo 13 (1995), Twister (1996), Titanic (1997), U-571 (2000), Edge of Tomorrow (2014) and Nightcrawler (2014). Paxton also starred in the HBO drama series Big Love (2006–11). In 2013, he received an Emmy Award nomination for his performance in the miniseries Hatfields & McCoys.


    Joseph Albert Wapner (November 15, 1919 – February 26, 2017) was an American judge and television personality. He was the first presiding judge of the ongoing reality court show The People's Court. The court show's first run in syndication, with Wapner presiding as judge, lasted from 1981 to 1993, for 12 seasons and 2,484 episodes. While the show's second run has been presided over by multiple judges, Wapner was the sole judge to preside during the court show's first run. His tenure on the program made him the first jurist of arbitration-based reality court shows, which are now a most popular trend in the judicial genre.

  23. #123
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    March 2017 Notable Deaths


    Robert Jolin Osborne (/ˈɒzbɔːrn/; May 3, 1932 – March 6, 2017)[1][2] was an American actor, film historian, television presenter, and author, best known for more than twenty years as the primary host of the cable channel Turner Classic Movies (TCM). Prior to TCM, Osborne had been a host on The Movie Channel,[3] and, earlier, a columnist for The Hollywood Reporter. Osborne also wrote the official history of the Academy Awards, originally published in 1988, and most recently revised in 2013.[4]


    Joan Elise "Joni" Sledge (September 13, 1956 – March 10, 2017[4]) was an American singer–songwriter, actress and producer. Sledge was best known as a founding member of the American family vocal group Sister Sledge, who were best known for their hits during the mid–1970s through the mid–1990s; most notably 1979's "We Are Family" and "He's The Greatest Dancer".[5][6] Sledge died from natural causes on March 10, 2017 at age 60.[7]


    Kim Jong-nam (Chosŏn'gŭl: 김정남; Hancha: 金正男, Korean pronunciation: [kim.dzʌŋ.nam] or [kim] [tsʌŋ.nam]; 10 May 1971 – 13 February 2017) was the eldest son of North Korean leader Kim Jong-il. From roughly 1994 to 2001, he was considered the heir apparent to his father.[1] He was thought to have fallen out of favour after embarrassing the regime in 2001 with a failed attempt to visit Tokyo Disneyland with a false passport, although Kim said his loss of favour was due to advocating reform.

    Kim was exiled from North Korea c. 2003, becoming an occasional critic of his family's regime.[2] His younger paternal half-brother, Kim Jong-un, was named heir apparent in September 2010.[3] Kim died on 13 February 2017 in Malaysia as the result of a suspected chemical attack.


    Lawrence Montaigne (February 26, 1931 – March 17, 2017) was an American actor, writer, dancer, and stuntman.[1] As an actor, he was known for his appearances on many 1960s-era television shows such as Star Trek.[1] Also starred in "The Great Escape" and "Escape to Witch Mountain"


    Charles Edward Anderson Berry (October 18, 1926 – March 18, 2017) was an American guitarist, singer and songwriter and one of the pioneers of rock and roll music. With songs such as "Maybellene" (1955), "Roll Over Beethoven" (1956), "Rock and Roll Music" (1957) and "Johnny B. Goode" (1958), Berry refined and developed rhythm and blues into the major elements that made rock and roll distinctive. Writing lyrics that focused on teen life and consumerism, and developing a music style that included guitar solos and showmanship, Berry was a major influence on subsequent rock music.[1]

    Born into a middle-class African-American family in St. Louis, Missouri, Berry had an interest in music from an early age and gave his first public performance at Sumner High School. While still a high school student he was convicted of armed robbery and was sent to a reformatory, where he was held from 1944 to 1947. After his release, Berry settled into married life and worked at an automobile assembly plant. By early 1953, influenced by the guitar riffs and showmanship techniques of the blues musician T-Bone Walker, Berry began performing with the Johnnie Johnson Trio.[2] His break came when he traveled to Chicago in May 1955 and met Muddy Waters, who suggested he contact Leonard Chess, of Chess Records. With Chess, he recorded "Maybellene"—Berry's adaptation of the country song "Ida Red"—which sold over a million copies, reaching number one on Billboard magazine's rhythm and blues chart.[3] By the end of the 1950s, Berry was an established star, with several hit records and film appearances and a lucrative touring career. He had also established his own St. Louis nightclub, Berry's Club Bandstand.[4] But in January 1962, he was sentenced to three years in prison for offenses under the Mann Act—he had transported a 14-year-old girl across state lines.[2][5][6] After his release in 1963, Berry had several more hits, including "No Particular Place to Go", "You Never Can Tell", and "Nadine". But these did not achieve the same success, or lasting impact, of his 1950s songs, and by the 1970s he was more in demand as a nostalgic performer, playing his past hits with local backup bands of variable quality.[2] His insistence on being paid in cash led in 1979 to a four-month jail sentence and community service, for tax evasion.

    Berry was among the first musicians to be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame on its opening in 1986; he was cited for having "laid the groundwork for not only a rock and roll sound but a rock and roll stance."[7] Berry is included in several of Rolling Stone magazine's "greatest of all time" lists; he was ranked fifth on its 2004 and 2011 list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time.[8] The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's 500 Songs That Shaped Rock and Roll includes three of Berry's: "Johnny B. Goode", "Maybellene", and "Rock and Roll Music".[9] Berry's "Johnny B. Goode" is the only rock-and-roll song included on the Voyager Golden Record.[10]


    David Rockefeller (June 12, 1915 – March 20, 2017) was an American banker who was chairman and chief executive of Chase Manhattan Corporation. He was the oldest living member of the Rockefeller family and family patriarch from August 2004[1] until his death in March 2017. Rockefeller was a son of John D. Rockefeller Jr. and Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, and a grandson of John D. Rockefeller and Laura Spelman Rockefeller.

    He was noted for his wide-ranging political connections and foreign travel, in which he met with a range of foreign leaders. His fortune was estimated at $3.3 billion at the time of his death in March 2017.


    Charles Hirsch "Chuck" Barris (June 3, 1929 – March 21, 2017)[1] was an American game show creator, producer, and host. Barris was known for hosting The Gong Show, and creating The Dating Game and The Newlywed Game. He was also a songwriter, who wrote "Palisades Park" for Freddy Cannon and an autobiography titled Confessions of a Dangerous Mind, which was made into the film of the same name directed by George Clooney.


    John Thomas "Sib" Hashian (August 17, 1949 – March 22, 2017) was an American musician, best known as a drummer for the rock band Boston.

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    Donald Jay Rickles (May 8, 1926 – April 6, 2017) was an American stand-up comedian, actor, and author. He became well known as an insult comic, but his pudgy, balding appearance and pugnacious style led to few leading roles in film or television. His prominent film roles included Run Silent, Run Deep (1958) with Clark Gable and Kelly's Heroes (1970) with Clint Eastwood, and beginning in 1976 he enjoyed a two-year run starring in the NBC television sitcom C.P.O. Sharkey.

    He received widespread exposure as a popular guest on numerous talk and variety shows, including The Dean Martin Show, The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson and Late Show with David Letterman, and later voiced Mr. Potato Head in the Toy Story franchise. He won a Primetime Emmy Award for the 2007 documentary Mr. Warmth: The Don Rickles Project.


    John Warren "J." Geils Jr. (/ɡaɪlz/) (February 20, 1946 – April 11, 2017) was an American guitarist. He was known as the leader of The J. Geils Band.[1]

    Growing up in New York City, Geils became interested in jazz and blues. After moving to Massachusetts for his college education, he formed the J. Geils Blues Band while still a student at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. After dropping the word "Blues" from their name, the band released their first album in 1970, performing soul and rhythm and blues-influenced rock music for most of the 1970s before turning to pop music in the 1980s. After the band broke up in 1985, Geils left regular performing to take up restoration and racing of automobiles, with occasional forays into music production. He continued to appear in reunion tours with the rest of his band sporadically during the 2000s and 2010s. He died of natural causes at the age of 71 on April 11, 2017, at his home in Groton, Massachusetts.


    Charles Quinton Murphy (July 12, 1959 – April 12, 2017) was an American actor, comedian and writer. Murphy was best known as a writer and cast member of the Comedy Central sketch-comedy series Chappelle's Show. He was the older brother of Eddie Murphy.


    George Clifton James (May 29, 1920 – April 15, 2017) was an American actor, best known for his roles as Sheriff J.W. Pepper alongside Roger Moore in the James Bond films Live and Let Die (1973) and The Man with the Golden Gun (1974), the sheriff in Silver Streak (1976), and as the owner of the scandalous 1919 Chicago White Sox baseball team in Eight Men Out (1988).


    Cuba Gooding Sr. (April 27, 1944 – April 20, 2017) was an American singer and actor. He was the most successful lead singer of the soul group The Main Ingredient, replacing former lead singer Donald McPherson who died unexpectedly of leukemia. According to Billboard, as the lead vocalist he scored five top 10 hits most notably, "Everybody Plays the Fool" (1972), peaking at No. 2 for 3 weeks, and peaking at No. 3 on Billboard's all-genre Hot 100 list. "Just Don't Want to Be Lonely" (1974), "Happiness Is Just Around the Bend" and "Rolling Down a Mountainside" were also top 10 hits on Billboard charts. He also recorded as a solo artists with hits of his own.[1][2]


    Erin Marie Moran-Fleischmann[2] (October 18, 1960 – April 22, 2017) was an American actress, best known for playing Joanie Cunningham on the television sitcom Happy Days and its spin-off Joanie Loves Chachi.[3][4]


    Robert Jonathan Demme (/ˈdɛmi/ DEM-ee;[1] February 22, 1944 – April 26, 2017) was an American film director, producer, and screenwriter. He rose to prominence in the 1980s with his comedy films Melvin and Howard (1980), Swing Shift (1984), Something Wild (1986), and Married to the Mob (1988), as well as the critically acclaimed concert film Stop Making Sense (1984), in collaboration with the band Talking Heads. He became best known for directing The Silence of the Lambs (1991), for which he won the Academy Award for Best Director. He later directed the acclaimed films Philadelphia (1993) and Rachel Getting Married (2008).

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    Powers Allen Boothe (June 1, 1948 – May 14, 2017) was an American television and film actor. Some of his most notable roles include his Emmy-winning portrayal of Jim Jones in Guyana Tragedy: The Story of Jim Jones and his turns as TV detective Philip Marlowe in the 1980s, Cy Tolliver on Deadwood, "Curly Bill" Brocious in Tombstone, Vice-President and subsequently President Noah Daniels on 24, and Lamar Wyatt in Nashville.


    Chris Cornell (born Christopher John Boyle; July 20, 1964 – May 18, 2017) was an American musician, singer, and songwriter. He was best known as the lead vocalist for the rock bands Soundgarden and Audioslave. Cornell was also known for his numerous solo works and soundtrack contributions since 1991, and as the founder and frontman for Temple of the Dog, the one-off tribute band dedicated to his late friend Andrew Wood.

    Cornell is considered one of the chief architects of the 1990s grunge movement, and is well-known for his extensive catalog as a songwriter, his nearly four-octave vocal range,[3] and his powerful vocal belting technique. He released four solo studio albums, Euphoria Morning (1999), Carry On (2007), Scream (2009), Higher Truth (2015), and the live album Songbook (2011). Cornell received a Golden Globe Award nomination for his song "The Keeper", which appeared in the 2011 film Machine Gun Preacher, and co-wrote and performed the theme song to the James Bond film Casino Royale (2006), "You Know My Name". His last solo release was the charity single "The Promise", written for the ending credits for the film of the same name. He was voted "Rock's Greatest Singer" by readers of Guitar World,[4] ranked 4th in the list of "Heavy Metal's All-Time Top 100 Vocalists" by Hit Parader,[5] 9th in the list of "Best Lead Singers of All Time" by Rolling Stone,[6] and 12th in MTV's "22 Greatest Voices in Music".[7]

    Across his entire catalog, Cornell has sold 14.8 million albums, 8.8 million digital songs, and 300 million on-demand audio streams in the U.S. alone,[8][9] as well as over 30 million records worldwide.[10][11][12] He was nominated for 14 Grammy Awards and won twice.[13][14]

    Cornell suffered from depression and substance abuse problems earlier in his life. He died by suicide in his Detroit hotel room early on the morning of May 18, 2017, after performing at a Soundgarden concert the night before.[15]


    Roger Eugene Ailes (May 15, 1940 – May 18, 2017) was an American television executive and media consultant. He was the founder and one-time Chairman and CEO of Fox News and the Fox Television Stations Group, from which he resigned in July 2016 following allegations that he sexually harassed female colleagues. Ailes was a media consultant for Republican presidents Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, and George H. W. Bush,[1] and for Rudy Giuliani's first mayoral campaign. In 2016, after he left Fox News, he became an adviser to the Donald Trump campaign, where he assisted with debate preparation.[2]


    Lisa Ann Spoonauer (December 16, 1972 – May 20, 2017)[1] was an American character actress best known for the role of Caitlin Bree in Clerks, which she reprised for an episode in the animated series.


    Sir Roger George Moore, KBE (/mɔər/; 14 October 1927 – 23 May 2017) was an English actor. He is best known for having played secret agent James Bond in seven feature films from 1973 to 1985. He also played Simon Templar in the television series The Saint from 1962 to 1969 and Lord Brett Sinclair in The Persuaders! from 1971 to 1972.

    Moore took over the role of Bond from Sean Connery in 1972, and made his first appearance as 007 in Live and Let Die (1973). The longest serving Bond, he went on to portray the spy in six more films.[2][3] Appointed a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador in 1991, Moore was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in 2003 for "services to charity". In 2007, he received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for his work in television and in film. In 2008, the French government appointed Moore a Commander of the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres.


    James Paul David Bunning (October 23, 1931 – May 26, 2017) was an American professional baseball pitcher and later a politician who represented constituents from Kentucky in both chambers of the United States Congress. He is the sole Major League Baseball athlete to have been elected to both the United States Senate and the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

    Bunning pitched from 1955 to 1971 for the Detroit Tigers, Philadelphia Phillies, Pittsburgh Pirates, and Los Angeles Dodgers. When Bunning retired, he had the second-highest total career strikeouts in Major League history; he currently ranks 17th. As a member of the Phillies, Bunning pitched the seventh perfect game in Major League Baseball history on June 21, 1964, the first game of a Father's Day doubleheader at Shea Stadium, against the New York Mets. The perfect game was the first since 1880 in the National League.[1] Bunning was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in 1996 after election by the Hall's Veterans Committee.

    After retiring from baseball, Bunning returned to his native northern Kentucky and was elected to the Fort Thomas city council, then the Kentucky Senate, in which he served as minority leader. In 1986, Bunning was elected to the United States House of Representatives from Kentucky's 4th congressional district, and served in the House from 1987 to 1999. He was elected to the United States Senate from Kentucky in 1998 and served two terms as the Republican junior U.S. Senator. In July 2009, he announced that he would not run for re-election in 2010. Bunning gave his farewell speech to the Senate on December 9, 2010, and was succeeded by current Senator Rand Paul on January 3, 2011.


    Gregory Lenoir "Gregg" Allman (December 8, 1947 – May 27, 2017) was an American singer-songwriter. He was known for performing in the Allman Brothers Band. Allman grew up with an interest in rhythm and blues music, and the Allman Brothers Band fused it with rock music, jazz, and country at times. He wrote several of the band's biggest songs, including "Whipping Post", "Melissa", and "Midnight Rider". Allman also had a successful solo career, releasing seven studio albums. He was born and spent much of his childhood in Nashville, Tennessee, before relocating to Daytona Beach, Florida.

    He and his brother, Duane Allman, formed the Allman Brothers Band in 1969, which reached mainstream success with their 1971 live album At Fillmore East. Shortly thereafter, Duane was killed in a motorcycle crash. The band continued on, with Brothers and Sisters (1973) representing their largest sales. Allman began a solo career with Laid Back the same year, and was perhaps most famous for his marriage to pop star Cher for the rest of the decade. He had an unexpected late career hit in the song "I'm No Angel" in 1987, and his seventh solo album, Low Country Blues (2011), saw the highest chart positions of his career. Throughout his life, Allman struggled with alcohol and substance abuse, which formed the basis of his acclaimed memoir My Cross to Bear (2012). His final album, Southern Blood, is scheduled to be released September 8, 2017.

    Allman performed with a Hammond organ and guitar, and was recognized for his soulful voice. For his work in music, Allman was referred to as a Southern rock pioneer[1] and received numerous awards, including several Grammys; he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and the Georgia Music Hall of Fame. His distinctive voice placed him in 70th place in the Rolling Stone list of the "100 Greatest Singers of All Time".[2]

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    Manuel Antonio Noriega Moreno (Spanish pronunciation: [maˈnwel noˈɾjeɣa]; February 11, 1934 – May 29, 2017)[a] was a Panamanian politician and military officer, and longtime CIA informant. He was military dictator of Panama from 1983 to 1989, when he was removed from power by the United States invasion of Panama.

    Born in Panama City, Noriega studied at a military school in Lima and at the School of the Americas. He became an officer in the Panamanian army, and rose through the ranks in alliance with Omar Torrijos, becoming chief of military intelligence after Torrijos led a coup in 1968. After Torrijos' death in 1981, Noriega consolidated his power until he became the de facto ruler of Panama in 1983. From the 1950s until shortly before the U.S. invasion, Noriega worked closely with the U.S. CIA. Noriega was one of the CIA's most valued intelligence sources, as well as one of the primary conduits for illicit weapons, military equipment and cash destined for U.S.-backed counter-insurgency forces throughout Central and South America. Noriega was also seen by the U.S. as a collaborator in the war on drugs, despite Noriega himself having amassed a personal fortune through drug trafficking operations. Though his U.S. intelligence handlers were aware of this, it was allowed because of his usefulness to the U.S.

    Noriega's rule in Panama was marked by repression of the media, an expansion of the military, and the persecution of political opponents, effectively controlled the outcomes of any elections. In 1988, Noriega was indicted by the United States on drug trafficking charges in Miami. During the 1989 U.S. invasion of Panama, he was removed from power, captured, detained as a prisoner of war, and flown to the United States. Noriega was tried on eight counts of drug trafficking, racketeering, and money laundering in April 1992. On September 16, 1992, he was sentenced to 40 years in prison, which was later reduced to 30 years.

    Noriega's U.S. prison sentence ended in September 2007;[3] pending the outcome of extradition requests by both Panama and France, for convictions in absentia for murder in 1995 and money laundering in 1999. France was granted its extradition request in April 2010. He arrived in Paris on April 27, 2010,[4] and after the re-trial that is a rule in France after any in absentia sentence, he was found guilty and sentenced to seven years in jail in July 2010.[5] A conditional release was granted on September 23, 2011, for Noriega to be extradited to serve 20 years in Panama. He returned to Panama on December 11, 2011. Noriega died at Hospital Santo Tomas in Panama City on May 29, 2017,[6] two months after brain surgery.[7]


    Molly Peters (15 March 1942 – 30 May 2017) was an English actress best known for her role in the James Bond film Thunderball.

 

 

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